Duracell Packaging Problems
The current packaging is difficult to open, doesn't stand out on shelf, hard to know how much energy opened packages have, and hard to store at home.
Competitors
Energizer is Duracell's main competitor, with packaging that is bright and welcoming, helping it stand out on the shelf. Meijer's generic batteries are the cheaper alternative, with similar dark packaging that blend into the shelf.
User Journey
Users typically buy batteries as they're needed. They store batteries loose in a drawer or in a plastic bag to keep track of them. The most common group of people purchasing batteries are moms, who buy for the whole family.
Prototype Sketches
Research in mind, we began sketching solutions to the problem. Remembering that storability and ease of access were important to the users, we narrowed down our ideas and decided to focus on resealable packaging. 
Low-Fidelity Prototypes
After sketching, we quickly prototyped out some of our promising resealable package ideas. During this phase, our team realized that the package needed to be small enough to fit in a drawer.
“You can just tell that it's easier to open”
“You can just tell that it's easier to open”
"I like how this fits in my hand"
"I like how this fits in my hand"
Mid-Fidelity Prototypes
We focused on our prototype that would be most effective for storage, which folds in to reseal on the side, and fits inside a drawer easily.
After testing, we moved forward with high-fidelity prototypes. We designed a die-cut and produced it with a Cricut.
Packaging was re-designed in a minimalist style, with emphasis on the white and orange to help the product stand out in the store.
How much energy do these have?
The new battery cover features a pull tab that, when pulled, reveals the message "Please Recycle Me," helping users to keep their batteries in order in an open package or drawer.
"It feels more earth-friendly"
"It feels more earth-friendly"
Better for the Environment
Plastic waste from packaging is released into the environment, where it is nearly indestructible and may take thousands of years to degrade, compared to the weeks or months it takes for paper to degrade, which is why we chose to omit plastic from our solution.
Contributors:
Elizabeth Roethlisberger
Owen Fedewa
Serena Bow

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